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This course introduces foundations of American Sign Language including linguistic perspectives, dialogue skill set, vocabulary, and syntax. Instruction may also include sociocultural contexts regarding the Deaf community, culture, and history. Note: Students with any ASL language background must see Instructor to determine eligibility for course.
Antirequisite(s): English 2095A taken in Fall 2019.
Extra Information: 3 hours.

Weight:0.5
Breadth:CATEGORY B
Subject Code:ASL
Decision analysis, linear programming, integer programming, statistical distributions, Markov chains, Monte Carlo simulation, queuing, discrete event simulation. Students will use a variety of tools to investigate applications including transportation networks, revenue management, production scheduling and sports analytics.
Prerequisite(s): 0.5 course from Analytics and Decision Sciences 2288A/B, Data Science 1200A/B, or Statistical Sciences 2864A/B; and 1.0 courses from any 1000-level courses in Applied Mathematics, Calculus, Mathematics, Numerical and Mathematical Methods, and/or Statistical Sciences.Pre-or Corequisite(s): 0.5 course from: Economics 2122A/B, Economics 2222A/B, Statistical Sciences 2035, Statistical Sciences 2141A/B, Statistical Sciences 2857A/B, or by permission of the School of Management, Economics, and Mathematics.
Antirequisite(s): Financial Modelling 3817A/B, Statistical Sciences 4654A/B.
Extra Information: 3 lecture hours, 2 lab hours.

Weight:0.5
Breadth:CATEGORY A
Subject Code:ADS
Stochastic optimization modelling, decision making under uncertainty, simulation modelling, regression and forecasting models, and sensitivity analysis.
Prerequisite(s): Analytics and Decision Sciences 2298A/B, 0.5 from Mathematics 1229A/B or Mathematics 1600A/B; 1.0 from Economics 2122A/B, Economics 2123A/B, Economics 2222A/B, Economics 2223A/B or Analytics and Decision Sciences 2036A/B, Statistical Sciences 2035, Statistical Sciences 2857A/B, Statistical Sciences 2858A/B.
Extra Information: 3 lecture hours, 1 lab hour.

Weight:0.5
Breadth:CATEGORY A
Subject Code:ADS
Statistical programming in a high-level language, data visualization design principles, extracting insights from data visualization, data mining and machine learning, data classification; visualization of multivariate, time-series, and hierarchical data.
Prerequisite(s): 0.5 course from Analytics and Decision Sciences 2288F/G or Statistics 2864A/B; and 1.0 course from Economics 2122A/B, Economics 2222A/B, Economics 2123A/B, Economics 2223A/B or Analytics and Decision Sciences 2036A/B, Statistical Sciences 2035, Statistical Sciences 2857A/B, Statistical Sciences 2858A/B; or by permission of the School of Management, Economics, and Mathematics.
Extra Information: 3 lecture hours, 2 lab hours.

Weight:0.5
Breadth:CATEGORY A
Subject Code:ADS
Business Administration 1220E, offered by the Ivey Business School, gives students from all faculties the opportunity to learn business fundamentals in finance, marketing, operations, organizational behavior and general management. The course is delivered using Ivey\'s renowned case method, which challenges students to learn by doing, within an active class environment of no more than 85 students. Students explore real business issues, make management decisions, defend their position, and take action. This course will be particularly appealing to those students who want a glimpse of Ivey\'s unique learning experience.
Antirequisite(s): Business Administration 1299E, Business Administration 2295F/G, Business Administration 2299E.
Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Weight:1
Breadth:CATEGORY A
Subject Code:BUSINESS
Topic and course description will be available at time of registration.
Prerequisite(s): Childhood and Social Institutions 1025F/G, or permission of the CSI Program Coordinator.
Extra Information: 3 lecture/tutorial hours.

Weight:0.5
Breadth:CATEGORY A
Subject Code:CSI
Topic and course description will be available at time of registration.
Prerequisite(s): Childhood and Social Institutions 1025F/G, or permission of the CSI Program Coordinator.
Extra Information: 3 lecture/tutorial hours.

Weight:0.5
Breadth:CATEGORY A
Subject Code:CSI
An introduction to the study of childhood and law in Canada. By examining specific cases, statutes, treaties, and practices, students will have an opportunity to increase their understanding of the most relevant doctrines, principles, and debates about childhood in Canadian legal and political culture.
Prerequisite(s): Childhood and Youth Studies 1025F/G or the former Childhood and Social Institutions 1025F/G.
Antirequisite(s): The former Childhood and Social Institutions 2250F/G, the former Childhood and Social Institutions 2256F/G, and the former Childhood and Social Institutions 2253F/G.
Extra Information: 3 hours.

Weight:0.5
Breadth:CATEGORY A
Subject Code:CYS
This course offers a foundation to engage in the conceptual and practical considerations of children and their place within discourses of advocacy. It offers a context for understanding the societal limitations that have defined advocacy with children, alongside a growing theoretical realisation of the value of engaging with children as ‘participants’.
Prerequisite(s): Childhood and Youth Studies 1025F/G or the former Childhood and Social Institutions 1025F/G.
Extra Information: 3 hours.

Weight:0.5
Breadth:CATEGORY A
Subject Code:CYS
An advanced seminar on participatory research methodology involving children and youth. Students will analyze literature, hypothesize research questions, locate sites and methods, and confront logistical and ethical questions of social research with children.
Prerequisite(s): Childhood and Youth Studies 1025F/G or the former Childhood and Social Institutions 1025F/G and any course in Childhood and Youth Studies at the 2200-level.
Extra Information: 3 lecture/tutorial hours.

Weight:0.5
Breadth:CATEGORY A
Subject Code:CYS
Childhood advocacy discourses and practices operate within institutional contexts populated by existing organizational discourses, policies, and practices often embedded in a network of interconnected agencies and groups. This course examines the enabling as well as restrictive features of the role adults play in terms of facilitating and inhibiting the planning, adoption and implementation of childhood advocacy initiatives.
Prerequisite(s): Childhood and Youth Studies 2214F/G or the former Childhood and Social Institutions 2214F/G.
Extra Information: 3 seminar hours.

Weight:0.5
Breadth:CATEGORY A
Subject Code:CYS
Through field interventions, this course will examine various approaches to consulting children about issues affecting them, as well as ways of including the consultations in an organization’s planning and decision-making processes.
Prerequisite(s): Any course in Childhood and Youth Studies at the 2200-level.
Extra Information: 3 hours.

Weight:0.5
Breadth:CATEGORY A
Subject Code:CYS
Topic and course description will be available at time of registration.
Prerequisite(s): Childhood and Youth Studies 1025F/G or the former Childhood and Social Institutions 1025F/G.
Extra Information: 3 lecture/tutorial hours.

Weight:0.5
Breadth:CATEGORY A
Subject Code:CYS
Topic and course description will be available at time of registration.
Prerequisite(s): Any course in Childhood and Youth Studies at the 2200-level.
Extra Information: 3 lecture/tutorial hours.

Weight:0.5
Breadth:CATEGORY A
Subject Code:CYS
This is a limited-enrollment, international exchange seminar in with a travel component. It brings together students studying childhood and youth at Kings College and a University in the United Kingdom. We compare childhood and youth in these respective regions as it is situated in social institutions.
Prerequisite(s): Admission is by special permission of the Chair of Childhood and Youth Studies
Antirequisite(s): the former Childhood and Social Institutions 3393A/B if taken in 2015-16 or 2018-19.
Extra Information: 3 seminar hours

Weight:0.5
Breadth:CATEGORY A
Subject Code:CYS
Explores provocative ethical and practical Disability Studies topics using a Liberal Arts framework. Students actively engage both sides of cases with legal, medical, and recreational significance. Examines how disability, mental health and neuro-diversity intersect with modern culture and social institutions.
Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Weight:0.5
Breadth:CATEGORY A
Subject Code:DISABST
The evolution and diversification of Disability Studies has led to innovative ways of rethinking disability such as: rights, sexuality, race, Marxism, globality, the body, post-structuralism. Students learn how these ideas extend, alter or challenge existing paradigms and how to critically analyze and compare DS research.
Prerequisite(s): Disability Studies 2201F/G.
Antirequisite(s): Disability Studies 2293A/B if taken in 2016-17.
Extra Information: 3 hours.

Weight:0.5
Breadth:CATEGORY A
Subject Code:DISABST
Interaction with health and social care systems is inevitable for many people who live with disabilities. This course examines barriers people encounter when seeking to access resources and services. Using narrative case studies grounded in lived experience, students practice applying theoretical concepts to develop practical solutions to real-world challenges.
Prerequisite(s): Disability Studies 2201F/G or Disability Studies 2221A/B or Disability Studies 2292A/B if taken in 2021-22, or permission of the Instructor.
Antirequisite(s): Disability Studies 3395F/G if taken in 2018-19, 2019-20.
Extra Information: 3 hours.

Weight:0.5
Breadth:CATEGORY A
Subject Code:DISABST
National income; aggregate supply and aggregate demand; inflation, unemployment and interest rates; money and monetary institutions; economic growth; balance of payments; and exchange rates.
Pre-or Corequisite(s): Economics 1021A/B must be taken prior to or at the same time as 1022A/B. Students are strongly advised to take Economics 1021A/B before taking Economics 1022A/B.
Extra Information: 2 lecture hours, 1 tutorial hour (Main), 3 lecture hours (Huron, King's)

Weight:0.5
Breadth:CATEGORY A
Subject Code:ECONOMIC
This half course in intermediate monetary theory covers such topics as: the flow of funds, a detailed analysis of the demand for money, the behavior of financial institutions and issues in monetary policy.
Prerequisite(s): Economics 1021A/B and Economics 1022A/B.
Antirequisite(s): Economics 3371A/B.
Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Weight:0.5
Breadth:CATEGORY A
Subject Code:ECONOMIC
An introduction to econometric description and inference which covers: descriptive statistics for cross-section and time-series samples; probability, discrete and continuous probability distributions, random variables; estimators and sampling distributions; confidence intervals and tests of hypotheses; simple linear regression for normal and non-normal populations.
Prerequisite(s): Economics 1021A/B and Economics 1022A/B; 0.5 from Mathematics 1225A/B, Mathematics 1230A/B, Calculus 1000A/B, and 0.5 from Mathematics 1229A/B, Mathematics 1600A/B, Calculus 1301A/B or Calculus 1501A/B.
Antirequisite(s) at Main campus: Biology 2244A/B, Economics 2122A/B, Geography 2210A/B, Health Sciences 3801A/B, MOS 2242A/B, Psychology 2811A/B, the former Psychology 2810, the former Psychology 2820E, Psychology 2830A/B, Psychology 2850A/B, Psychology 2851A/B, Social Work 2207A/B, Sociology 2205A/B, Statistical Sciences 2035, Statistical Sciences 2141A/B, Statistical Sciences 2143A/B, Statistical Sciences 2244A/B, Statistical Sciences 2858A/B. Students wishing to enroll in higher-level courses in the Department of Statistics and Actuarial Sciences are encouraged to consult that department. Antirequisite(s) at Huron, King's campus : All other courses in Introductory Statistics (except Statistical Sciences 1023A/B and Statistical Sciences 1024A/B): Biology 2244A/B, Economics 2122A/B, Geography 2210A/B, Health Sciences 3801A/B, MOS 2242A/B, Psychology 2811A/B, the former Psychology 2810, the former Psychology 2820E, Psychology 2830A/B, Psychology 2850A/B, Psychology 2851A/B, Social Work 2207A/B, Sociology 2205A/B, Statistical Sciences 2035, Statistical Sciences 2141A/B, Statistical Sciences 2143A/B, Statistical Sciences 2244A/B, Statistical Sciences 2858A/B.
Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.Note: This course cannot be taken concurrently with or prior to taking Data Science 1000A/B as they will become antirequisites to one another in these sequences.

Weight:0.5
Breadth:CATEGORY A
Subject Code:ECONOMIC
An introductory course in regression analysis which covers: multivariate probability distributions; the classical linear regression model; heteroskedasticity; autocorrelation; introduction to time series; unit roots and cointegration; dynamic linear models; diagnostic testing; instrumental variables; nonlinearities and limited dependent variables.
Prerequisite(s): Economics 2222A/B or Economics 2122A/B or Statistical Sciences 2035 with a minimum mark of 70%; 0.5 from Mathematics 1225A/B, Mathematics 1230A/B, Calculus 1000A/B, and 0.5 from Mathematics 1229A/B, Mathematics 1600A/B, Calculus 1301A/B or Calculus 1501A/B.
Antirequisite(s) at Main Campus: Economics 2123A/B and Statistical Sciences 3859A/B.Antirequisite(s) at Huron and King's: Economics 2123A/B.
Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Weight:0.5
Breadth:CATEGORY A
Subject Code:ECONOMIC
Using selected examples, this course will introduce students to the variety of ways to conduct research in applied economics. Students will be exposed to different analytical techniques, examples of modelling problems, data collection issues and hypothesis testing.
Prerequisite(s): Economics 2221A/B or Economics 2153A/B; Economics 2223A/B or Economics 2123A/B; Economics 2261A/B or Economics 2151A/B.
Extra Information: 3 seminar hours.

Weight:1
Breadth:CATEGORY A
Subject Code:ECONOMIC
Theories of expected utility and uncertainty, game theory, oligopoly behavior and industrial organization.
Prerequisite(s): Economics 2261A/B or Economics 2151A/B.
Antirequisite(s): Economics 3382A/B
Extra Information: 3 lecture hours

Weight:0.5
Breadth:CATEGORY A
Subject Code:ECONOMIC
Individual guidance in the selection of a topic, research methodology and the writing of a thesis.
Prerequisite(s): Economics 3313E, Economics 3378A/B, or Economics 3385A/B.

Weight:1
Breadth:CATEGORY A
Subject Code:ECONOMIC
The English Literature unit of the King\'s Foundations in the New Liberal Arts is supplemented by the study of art and music. It investigates influential works of literature from ancient to modern times through an interdisciplinary perspective, with special focus on innovations in literary form and cultural contexts.
Prerequisite(s): Must be registered in the New Liberal Arts, or the former Western Thought and Civilization.Corequisite(s): History 1901E and Philosophy 1901E.
Extra Information: 3 hours. There may be additional costs associated with field trips.

Weight:1
Breadth:CATEGORY B
Subject Code:ENGLISH
Course Description: This course offers an intensive examination of the major critical methodologies relevant to the academic study of literature. In weekly two-hour lectures and weekly one-hour tutorials that encourage the critical practice of slow reading, students will examine one or more primary literary texts and consider it through a variety of critical lenses.
Prerequisite(s): At least 60% in 1.0 of English 1000-1999, or Writing 1020F/G or Writing 2101F/G or permission of the Department.
Extra Information: 3 hours.

Weight:0.5
Breadth:CATEGORY B
Subject Code:ENGLISH
This course offers advanced study in the theory and analysis of digital narratives. Students will produce a hypertext version of a literary text and develop a text adventure game. No previous coding experience is necessary.
Prerequisite(s): At least 60% in 1.0 of English 1020-1999 or permission of the Department.
Antirequisite(s): English 1028F/G taken at King’s University College (2015-2020).
Extra Information: 3 hours.

Weight:0.5
Breadth:CATEGORY B
Subject Code:ENGLISH
Shakespeare remains one of the most influential of English writers. This course studies twelve plays across a range of genres. Instructors may integrate theatre-oriented exercises and/or other dramatic or non-dramatic material, depending on individual emphasis. When possible, the teaching program will include an autumn theatre trip.
Prerequisite(s): At least 60% in 1.0 of English 1020-1999 or permission of the Department.
Antirequisite(s): English 2371E, English 2372F/G, English 2373F/G, English 2430E and the former English 3227E.
Extra Information: 3 hours.

Weight:1
Breadth:CATEGORY B
Subject Code:ENGLISH
An opportunity for students to learn about the craft of fiction and poetry, and to develop their individual voices as they express themselves through a variety of genres. Students should expect to produce a substantial quantity of work. Enrolment limited.
Prerequisite(s): At least 60% in 1.0 of English 1000-1999, or Writing 1020F/G or Writing 2101F/G or permission of the Department.
Antirequisite(s): English 3998E; the former English 2998E.
Extra Information: 3 hours.

Weight:0.5
Breadth:CATEGORY B
Subject Code:ENGLISH
Topics will vary from year to year. Please consult Department for current offerings.
Prerequisite(s): 1.0 from English 3000-3999 or permission of the Department.
Extra Information: 3 hours.

Weight:0.5
Breadth:CATEGORY B
Subject Code:ENGLISH
For specific topics consult the Department of Modern Languages.
Prerequisite(s): 1.0 French course in literature between French 3500-3799.
Extra Information: 3 lecture/tutorial hours.

Weight:0.5
Breadth:CATEGORY B
Subject Code:FRENCH
Study of specific problems in French language.
Prerequisite(s): French 3900 or French 3300 or 1.0 course from French 3306A/B, French 3307A/B, French 3905A/B, French 3907A/B, French 3908A/B, or permission of the Department based on Placement Test. Placement Test results do not guarantee admission into the course. Written permission must be obtained from the Department.
Antirequisite(s) at Main campus: French 4901A/B.
Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Weight:0.5
Breadth:CATEGORY B
Subject Code:FRENCH
A survey of selected topics in the study of gender structures and the status of women in historical and cross-cultural perspective. These will include consideration of social and psychological processes by which gender identity is established in the individual, its institutional manifestations, and its articulation with class and race structures.
Extra Information: 2 lecture hours, 1 tutorial hour (Main); 3 hours, limited enrolment (King's)

Weight:1
Breadth:CATEGORY A CATEGORY B
Subject Code:GSWS
The course is divided into sections on the image of women in literature, film and art; psycho- social development; the effects of social structure on women; and differences among women. These topics are addressed from the perspective of literature, psychology, theology, sociology, etc.
Prerequisite(s): GSWS 1020E or completion of first year university.
Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Weight:1
Breadth:CATEGORY A CATEGORY B
Subject Code:GSWS
Cultural, social, economic, and political themes including the Protestant and Catholic Reformations; the rise of absolutism; the commercial revolution; heresy, witchcraft, and scepticism; plague and health problems; the origins of modern science; demographic trends; the Puritans; baroque art and music; Cromwell, Gustavus Adolphus, and the creation of the modern army.
Antirequisite(s) at Main campus: History 2103, History 2450F/G, History 2460F/G.Antirequisite(s) at Huron campus: History 2103.Antirequisite(s) at King's campus: History 2103, History 2431F/G, History 2432F/G.
Extra Information: 2 lecture hours, 1 tutorial hour (Main); 3 lecture hours (Huron, King's).

Weight:1
Breadth:CATEGORY A
Subject Code:HISTORY
This course will analyze various Canadian social movements in terms of their historical factors, strategies and tactics; organizational challenges they faced; and the role that mass media, the state, individual personalities, and counter-movements played in determining their success and failures. Canadian social movements will be placed in their international context.
Prerequisite(s): 1.0 course in History at the 2200-level or above.
Antirequisite(s): History 3292E taught in 2009-10.
Extra Information: 3 hours.

Weight:1
Breadth:CATEGORY A
Subject Code:HISTORY
One-term placement with a government, private sector or non-governmental organization to provide a practical learning experience. Admission is competitive. Students will write a final report on work undertaken.
Prerequisite(s): Permission of the Academic Dean’s Office. Applicants must have anaverage of at least 70% and be enrolled in an Honours Specialization, Specialization orMajor module in the Social Sciences and be registered in third or fourth year.
Extra Information: Pass/Fail. Notes: International students should consult academic counselling about their eligibility. Students may not take any academic courses during the internship.

Weight:0.5
Breadth:CATEGORY A
Subject Code:INTERDIS
One-term placement with a government, private sector or non-governmental organization to provide a practical learning experience. Admission is competitive. Students will write a final report on work undertaken.
Prerequisite(s): Permission of the Academic Dean’s Office. Applicants must have an average of at least 70% and be enrolled in an Honours Specialization, Specialization or Major module in the Arts and Humanities and be registered in third or fourth year.
Extra Information: Pass/Fail. Notes: International students should consult academic counselling about their eligibility. Students may not take any academic courses during the internship.

Weight:0.5
Breadth:CATEGORY A
Subject Code:INTERDIS
A multidisciplinary approach to the study of human behavior in organizations from the individual, group and organizational levels of explanation.
Prerequisite(s): Enrolment in BMOS or Music Administrative Studies (MAS).
Antirequisite(s) at Main campus: MOS 2180.Antirequisite(s) at Huron, King's campus: MOS 2180, and King's MOS 2190A/B Special Topics, 2010-11 ONLY.
Extra Information: 3 lecture hours

Weight:0.5
Breadth:CATEGORY A
Subject Code:MOS
An introduction to intercultural relations for future managers and trade negotiators in a global work environment. Participants will learn the differences in thinking, communicating and behaving in different cultures, particularly as related to commercial enterprise. The course offers opportunities for students to develop their communication skills in cross-cultural situations.
Prerequisite(s): Business Administration 1220E plus one of Sociology 1020, Sociology 1021E, Management and Organizational Studies 2181A/B, Management and Organizational Studies 2155A/B, Management and Organizational Studies 2280F/G, Psychology 1000, Psychology 2060, Psychology 2660A/B, or permission of the Department.
Extra Information: 3 seminar hours.

Weight:0.5
Breadth:CATEGORY A
Subject Code:MOS
This course provides a broad overview of the principles, theories, and praxis of entrepreneurship, together with an understanding of the key tasks, skills, and attitudes required. It focuses on the "Effectuation" logic that serves entrepreneurs in the processes of opportunity identification and new venture creation based on existing resources.
Prerequisite(s): Completion of 5.0 1000-level courses.
Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Weight:0.5
Breadth:CATEGORY A
Subject Code:MOS
An introduction to Canadian business law, including: tort law, contracts, property, employment, partnerships, corporations, debtor and creditor, bankruptcy and insolvency, sale of goods and consumer protection. Cases and current events are used to illustrate legal issues and to solve legal problems.
Prerequisite(s): Enrolment in the BMOS or the Honours Specialization in Urban Development or Technical Entrepreneurship Certificate or the Honours Specialization or Specialization in Foods and Nutrition.
Antirequisite(s): Business Administration 4450A/B, Law 5510A/B, Law 5210A/B.
Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Weight:0.5
Breadth:CATEGORY A
Subject Code:MOS
This course studies derivative securities such as Forwards, Futures, Options, and SWAPs. Topics include an introduction to the institutions and pricing of derivative securities in commodity, interest rate, and foreign exchange markets, the use of derivative securities for hedging, speculation, and arbitrage, and their role as a stabilizing mechanism in the economy.
Prerequisite(s): Economics 2300A/B, Management and Organizational Studies 3310A/B, and enrolment in BMOS, or Major in Finance.
Antirequisite(s): Management and Organizational Studies 4312A/B.
Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Weight:0.5
Breadth:CATEGORY A
Subject Code:MOS
This course examines the major theories of investment finance and the pricing of bonds, stocks and options. Portfolio construction using both passive and active management strategies is also discussed.
Prerequisite(s): MOS 2310A/B or MOS 3310A/B and enrollment in BMOS.
Antirequisite(s): Economics 2121A/B, Economics 3346A/B.
Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Weight:0.5
Breadth:CATEGORY A
Subject Code:MOS
An introduction to the role of marketing in the organization including information systems, corporate strategy, opportunities assessment, product differentiation, pricing strategies, distribution, communication and advertising.
Prerequisite(s): Business Administration 2257, or MOS 2227A/B and MOS 2228A/B and enrollment in BMOS.
Antirequisite(s): MOS 2320A/B.
Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Weight:0.5
Breadth:CATEGORY A
Subject Code:MOS
An analysis of the principles, theories and practices critical to managing an organization. Overview of analytical models and approaches to improving operating systems. Attention is paid to both service and manufacturing operations.
Prerequisite(s): Business Administration 2257, or MOS 2227A/B and MOS 2228A/B and enrollment in BMOS.
Antirequisite(s) at Main campus: Business Administration 3304K.
Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Weight:0.5
Breadth:CATEGORY A
Subject Code:MOS
This course brings all of the Project Management Institute (PMI) knowledge areas of project management together into a consolidated whole, and provides the student an understanding of project management methodologies as well as the tools and techniques used to plan, execute and control various types of projects.
Prerequisite(s): Enrolment in the BMOS program in 3rd or 4th year.
Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Weight:0.5
Breadth:CATEGORY A
Subject Code:MOS
Due to globalization of commerce, a good understanding of international standards is necessary to ensure that companies can make effective and profitable decisions. This course teaches students how to formulate cost-effective strategies for the movement of goods and services across international borders, taking into account regulatory and documentation requirements.
Prerequisite(s): Enrolment in the BMOS program in 3rd or 4th year.
Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Weight:0.5
Breadth:CATEGORY A
Subject Code:MOS
An examination of managerial issues surrounding occupational health and safety practices and processes in Canada, with emphasis on the Province of Ontario. Technical, legislative, political and personal dimensions of the subject are examined, including managing a safety program.
Prerequisite(s): Enrollment in 3rd or 4th year of BMOS.
Antirequisite(s) at Main campus: Health Sciences 3030A/B.
Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Weight:0.5
Breadth:CATEGORY A
Subject Code:MOS
This course examines the economic, social, legal and political relationships among labour, management and the state with emphasis on organized labour and unionized workplaces in Canada.
Prerequisite(s): Enrollment in 3rd or 4th year of BMOS.
Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Weight:0.5
Breadth:CATEGORY A
Subject Code:MOS
An overview of the Income Tax Act (Canada) and its effect on taxation for individuals. Covers different sources of personal income, deductions and credits that are allowed under the Act. Also includes coverage of the Goods and Services Tax (GST/HST).
Prerequisite(s): MOS 3360A/B and enrolment in 3rd or 4th year of BMOS.
Antirequisite(s) at Main campus: Business Administration 4479A/B.
Extra Information: 4 lecture hours (Main); 3 lecture hours (Huron, King's).

Weight:0.5
Breadth:CATEGORY A
Subject Code:MOS
An introduction to auditing concepts and procedures. Students will learn to recognize statement assertions and the risks associated with them. Topics include audit methodology, ethics, judgment, and emphasizing assessment of the internal control system and its impact on audit risk.
Prerequisite(s): MOS 3361A/B and enrollment in 3rd or 4th year of BMOS.
Antirequisite(s): Business Administration 4497A/B.
Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Weight:0.5
Breadth:CATEGORY A
Subject Code:MOS
This course is designed to provide students with an exposure to fraud awareness, prevention and detection issues. This exploration of commercial crime and fraud topics in business will benefit students studying to become professionals in accounting, finance, human resources, management, and marketing.
Prerequisite(s): Enrollment in 3rd or 4th year of the BMOS program.
Antirequisite(s): MOS 3396A/B, if taken in 2012-2013, 2013-2014.
Extra Information: 3 seminar hours.

Weight:0.5
Breadth:CATEGORY A
Subject Code:MOS
What does it cost? This question is asked in every organization. The determination of cost is a key accounting process that supports decision making. This course will cover management accounting techniques related to cost: behaviour, allocation, determination, and strategic cost management.
Prerequisite(s): Business Administration 2257, or MOS 2228A/B, and enrolment in third or fourth year of BMOS, Honours Specialization in Urban Development or Music Administrative Studies (MAS).
Antirequisite(s): Business Administration 3307K.
Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Weight:0.5
Breadth:CATEGORY A
Subject Code:MOS
Examination of selected topics in Management and Organizational Studies. Topics and course outlines available at the beginning of each term.
Prerequisite(s): Enrollment in 3rd or 4th year of the BMOS program.
Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Weight:0.5
Breadth:CATEGORY A
Subject Code:MOS
The activities, reports and other contractual obligations of a minimum 8 month internship work term recognized and approved by the Department of Management and Organizational Studies.
Prerequisite(s): Enrolment in MOS 3494. Approval of, and acceptance into, an Internship Work Term.
Extra Information: 3.0 course, Pass/Fail.Note: (1)This credit cannot be included in the number of courses counted toward any degree or program; (2) Successful completion of MOS 3490 and MOS 3494 will be recognized on the student's transcript.

Weight:3
Breadth:CATEGORY A
Subject Code:MOS
The activities, reports and other contractual obligations of a 9-12 month internship work term recognized and approved by the Department of Management and Organizational Studies.
Prerequisite(s): Enrolment in MOS 3494. Approval of, and acceptance into, an Internship Work Term.
Extra Information: 3.0 course, Pass/Fail. Note: (1) This credit cannot be included in the number of courses counted toward any degree or program; (2) Successful completion of MOS 3491 and MOS 3494 will be recognized on the student's transcript.

Weight:3
Breadth:CATEGORY A
Subject Code:MOS
The activities, reports and other contractual obligations of a 13-16 month internship work term recognized and approved by the Department of Management and Organizational Studies.
Prerequisite(s): Enrolment in MOS 3494. Approval of, and acceptance into, an Internship Work Term.
Extra Information: 3.0 course, Pass/Fail.Note: (1) This credit cannot be included in the number of courses counted toward any degree or program; (2) Successful completion of MOS 3492 and MOS 3494 will be recognized on the student's transcript.

Weight:3
Breadth:CATEGORY A
Subject Code:MOS
This is an advanced core course in corporate finance theory and financial management. It focuses primarily on the analysis of long-term financial management decisions and the application of appropriate techniques. Topics covered include the cost of capital, capital budgeting, capital structure, dividend policy, leasing, and mergers and acquisitions.
Prerequisite(s): MOS 3310A/B or permission of the department.
Antirequisite(s): MOS 3311A/B.
Extra Information: 3 hours.

Weight:0.5
Breadth:CATEGORY A
Subject Code:MOS
An investigation into the challenges and practices of global enterprise, including alternative market entry strategies, long-term strategies for growth in foreign markets, foreign district investment, the role of trade organizations and international trade policies and standards, and the participation of the Canadian government.
Prerequisite(s): Enrolment in 4th year of BMOS or permission of the instructor.
Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Weight:0.5
Breadth:CATEGORY A
Subject Code:MOS
Identification and analysis of problems and strengths in the organizational environment, using models from the social sciences. Strategies designed to deal with organizational challenges will be explored.
Prerequisite(s): Enrolment in Year Four of BMOS or the Honours Specialization or Specialization in Foods and Nutrition.
Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Weight:0.5
Breadth:CATEGORY A
Subject Code:MOS
The goal of this essay course is to teach students what good governance is and how to do it. Topics covered may include: how to be a good director, understanding executive compensation, differences in corporate governance across cultures, governance ethics and governance of not-for-profit organizations.
Prerequisite(s): Enrolment in 4th year of BMOS or permission of the instructor.
Extra Information: 3 hours.

Weight:0.5
Breadth:CATEGORY A
Subject Code:MOS
This course further develops the student\'s knowledge of ethical standards and professional behaviour for accountants by increasing their awareness of ethical issues and provide them with the tools necessary to enhance their ability to identify, critically analyze, and resolve ethical issues that will be encountered in their accounting career.
Prerequisite(s): Enrollment in 3rd or 4th year of the BMOS program.
Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Weight:0.5
Breadth:CATEGORY A
Subject Code:MOS
Seminar course reviewing the main theories of management. Readings will focus on the main ideas of each theory. Students will therefore be exposed to the breadth of the field as opposed to depth in one area, in general preparation for graduate management research.
Prerequisite(s): Registration in the fourth year of the BMOS program.
Extra Information: 3 hours.

Weight:0.5
Breadth:CATEGORY A
Subject Code:MOS
Set theory, algebra, functions and relations, trigonometry, logarithms and exponents.
Prerequisite(s): One or more of Ontario Secondary School MCF3M, MCR3U, or equivalent.
Antirequisite(s): Ontario Secondary School MCV4U, any university level calculus course.
Extra Information: 3 hours.

Weight:0.5
Breadth:CATEGORY C
Subject Code:MATH
This course considers contemporary environmental thought and how we understand the relation between humanity and the Earth. Topics include: climate change and justice, place and knowing, eco-affectivity and spirituality, and integral ecology. This course explores this question through world philosophical traditions including: East Asian Buddhist, Indigenous, and Western philosophy.
Extra Information: 3 hours.

Weight:0.5
Breadth:CATEGORY B
Subject Code:PHILOSOP
An examination of philosophical questions induced by encounter between radically different worldviews, paradigms, and ways of being. Particular, but not exclusive, attention is given to encounters between Indigenous and European frameworks. Topics include: identity and hybridity, theories of time, translation and borders, ways of knowing, language, stories, narratives, and world-making.
Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Weight:0.5
Breadth:CATEGORY B
Subject Code:PHILOSOP
This course is designed to address a series of overarching questions about law, governance and public policy. Students will learn a variety of theoretical and methodological approaches to study law and public policy, with a focus on the application of these debates to contemporary social and political issues.
Extra Information: 3 hours.

Weight:0.5
Breadth:CATEGORY A
Subject Code:POLISCI
An examination of selected problems in Canadian government and politics, such as federalism, political parties and pressure groups.
Prerequisite(s): 1.0 Political Science course(s) at the 1000-level.
Antirequisite(s) at Main campus, King's campus: Political Science 2103A/B, Political Science 2130, Political Science 2133A/B, Political Science 2221F/G, Political Science 2223F/G, Political Science 2530F/G, Political Science 2533F/G.Antirequisite(s) at Huron campus: Political Science 2103A/B, Political Science 2130, Political Science 2133A/B, Political Science 2221F/G, Political Science 2223F/G.
Extra Information: 3 hours.

Weight:1
Breadth:CATEGORY A
Subject Code:POLISCI
An examination of central themes and issues in the history of political thought from ancient to modern times.
Prerequisite(s): 1.0 Political Science course(s) at the 1000-level.
Antirequisite(s) at Main Campus: Philosophy 2800F/G, Philosophy 2801F/G, Philosophy 2802E, Political Science 2237W/X, Political Science 2537F/G, Political Science 2538F/G, the former Philosophy 2802E.Antirequisite(s) at Huron Campus: Philosophy 2800F/G, Philosophy 2802E, Political Science 2237W/X, the former Philosophy 2801F/G.Antirequisite(s) at King's Campus: Philosophy 2800F/G, Philosophy 2802E, Political Science 2237W/X, the former Philosophy 2801F/G, Political Science 2537F/G, Political Science 2538F/G.
Extra Information: 3 hours.

Weight:1
Breadth:CATEGORY A
Subject Code:POLISCI
Topics set by the Department.
Prerequisite(s): Enrolment in 3rd or 4th year in either Political Science or Social Justice and Peace Studies, or Permission of the Department.
Extra Information: 2 seminar hours.

Weight:0.5
Breadth:CATEGORY A
Subject Code:POLISCI
Women continue to be underrepresented in civic leadership. This course offers a unique experience for students who identify as women and are interested in becoming engaged in civic leadership and community building. Students are paired with a female civic leader to learn about the opportunities and barriers facing women.
Prerequisite(s): 1.0, or the equivalent, from: Social Justice and Peace Studies 2301A/B, Social Justice and Peace Studies 2302A/B, Social Justice and Peace Studies 2303A/B, Social Justice and Peace Studies 2304F/G, Political Science 2230E, Political Science 2236E, Political Science 2255F/G, Leadership Studies 2233A/B, the former Dimensions Of Leadership 2233A/B, and permission of the Program Co-ordinator/Chair.
Antirequisite(s): Social Justice and Peace Studies 3398F, Social Justice and Peace Studies 3399G in 2016-2017; Social Justice and Peace Studies 3320E.
Extra Information: 2 hours. Limited enrolment. Meeting minimum requirements does not guarantee admission to the course. Priority will be given to students registered in Political Science, Politics and International Relations or Social Justice and Peace Studies at Kings; or Political Science or Leadership Studies at Main campus. Application and interview are required. Check deadlines with your Program Coordinator/Chair.

Weight:1
Breadth:CATEGORY A
Subject Code:POLISCI
Topics set by the Department.
Prerequisite(s): Enrolment in 3rd or 4th year in either Political Science or Social Justice and Peace Studies, or permission of the Department
Extra Information: 2 seminar hours.

Weight:0.5
Breadth:CATEGORY A
Subject Code:POLISCI
This course addresses the negotiation, contestation, implementation, and enforcement of international trade law. Particular emphasis will be placed on the relationship between international trade law and negotiations and ostensibly non-trade areas including health, development, aid, environment, food safety, agriculture, water, and democracy.
Prerequisite(s): Enrolment in year three or four of Honours Specialization or Honours Double Major in Political Science, Politics and International Relations, Economics, Sociology or Social Justice and Peace Studies or permission of the department.
Extra Information: 2 seminar hours.

Weight:0.5
Breadth:CATEGORY A
Subject Code:POLISCI
Exploration of the exciting field of international negotiation. Students will get the opportunity to hone their diplomatic skills and to examine negotiation of peace agreements that fundamentally changed the modern world. Cases are drawn from peace talks that ended deadly wars in Africa, Americas, Asia, Europe andMiddle East.
Prerequisite(s): Political Science 2231E or permission of the Department.
Extra Information: 2 seminar hours.

Weight:0.5
Breadth:CATEGORY A
Subject Code:POLISCI
Survey of psychological research and theory in terms of their implications for educational practice. Topics will include learning, motivation, development, problem-solving, individual differences, teacher effectiveness, and assessment.
Prerequisite(s): A mark of at least 60% in 1.0 credits of Psychology at the 1000 level.
Antirequisite(s): Psychology 2620A/B.
Extra Information: 4 hours lecture/discussion.

Weight:0.5
Breadth:CATEGORY A
Subject Code:PSYCHOL
This course is an introduction to basic issues in psychological research. Topics covered include issues in observation and measurement, ethics, and basic issues involved in doing both non-experimental and experimental research.
Prerequisite(s): At least 60% in a 1000 level Psychology course; Mathematics 1228A/B and Statistical Sciences 1024A/B.
Antirequisite(s): Psychology 2830A/B, Psychology 2855F/G, Psychology 2856F/G, Psychology 2801F/G, Psychology 2802F/G, the former Psychology 2800E, the former Psychology 2820E.
Extra Information: 2 lecture hours, 2 laboratory hours.

Weight:0.5
Breadth:CATEGORY A
Subject Code:PSYCHOL
The purpose of this course is to acquaint students with some of the ways in which psychological evidence and techniques can be applied to the practice of law, business, education, the health sciences, etc.
Prerequisite(s): A mark of at least 60% in 1.0 credits of Psychology at the 1000 level.
Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Weight:0.5
Breadth:CATEGORY A
Subject Code:PSYCHOL
This course examines the neural processes that support sensation and perception, motor control, attention, memory, emotion, and language. It will include a student-led research project that applies current methods used in the field of cognitive neuroscience and will explore case studies of patients with neurological disorders.
Prerequisite(s): Psychology 2135A/B and Psychology 2840F/G and registration in the third or fourth year Honours Specialization, Honours Double Major, Major or Specialization in Psychology, Honours Specialization in Applied Psychology, or permission of the Department.
Antirequisite(s): Psychology 3224A/B, Psychology 3227A/B, Psychology 3994F/G at King's 2017- 18, 2018-2019 and 2019-20.
Extra Information: 2 lecture hours and 1 lab/tutorial per week.

Weight:0.5
Breadth:CATEGORY A
Subject Code:PSYCHOL
An introduction to the foundations and methods for developing questionnaires and surveys. Topics include methods and types of survey measurement, construction administration, data collection and reporting of results. Students may participate in the development of surveys with community partner agencies.
Prerequisite(s): Registration in third or fourth year Honours Specialization in Psychology, Honours Specialization in Applied Psychology, or minimum grade of 70% in Psychology 2840F/G (or minimum grade of 70% in both Psychology 2830A and Psychology 3830F/G at Huron); or minimum grade of 60% in both Psychology 2801F/G, Psychology 2802F/G or the former Psychology 2800E and Psychology 2811A/B and Psychology 2812A/B or the former Psychology 2810, or minimum grade of 70% in the former Psychology 2820E (or a minimum grade of 60% in both Psychology 2830A/B and Psychology 3830F/G at Huron). Other Psychology students and Special Students who receive a 70% in Psychology 2811A/B and Psychology 2812A/B or the former Psychology 2810 may also enroll in this course.
Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Weight:0.5
Breadth:CATEGORY A
Subject Code:PSYCHOL
Selected topics of current interest in Psychology. Topic available in Department.
Prerequisite(s): Psychology 2840F/G (or Psychology 2800E, Psychology 2820E, Psychology 2830A/B, Psychology 2855F/G or Psychology 2856F/G) and registration in the third or fourth year of Honours Specialization, Honours Double Major, Major or Specialization in Psychology, or permission of the Department.
Extra Information: 3 seminar hours

Weight:0.5
Breadth:CATEGORY A
Subject Code:PSYCHOL
Selected topics of current interest in Psychology. Topic available in Department.
Prerequisite(s): Psychology 2840F/G (or Psychology 2800E, Psychology 2820E, Psychology 2830A/B, Psychology 2855F/G or Psychology 2856F/G) and registration in the third or fourth year of Honours Specialization, Honours Double Major, Major or Specialization in Psychology, or permission of the Department.
Extra Information: 3 seminar hours.

Weight:0.5
Breadth:CATEGORY A
Subject Code:PSYCHOL
Through supervised placements in selected community/clinical settings, students will be introduced to the integration of psychological knowledge with practical human services practices. Placements hours are typically one full day per week in addition to scheduled seminars throughout the year.
Extra Information: Typically, one day placement per week, 2 seminar hours.

Weight:1
Breadth:CATEGORY A
Subject Code:PSYCHOL
In this experiential learning course, students will apply findings from basic psychological research to solve real-world problems. Working in teams, students will partner with local community groups to select and complete a research-based project. Final projects will be presented to a panel of researchers and community members.
Prerequisite(s): Registration in third or fourth year of an Honours Specialization or Honours Double Major in Psychology, Honours Specialization in Applied Psychology, or permission of the Department.
Extra Information: 3 hours.

Weight:1
Breadth:CATEGORY A
Subject Code:PSYCHOL
The purpose of this undergraduate seminar is to support students to demonstrate the links they have made between psychological theory and research, and its applications to real-world contexts. During the seminar students create a web-based electronic portfolio which highlights their learning skills and achievements, insights, and practical experiences.
Prerequisite(s): Psychology 3840F/G, Psychology 3891F/G and Psychology 3893F/G and registration in the fourth year of the Honours Specialization in Psychology or Honours Specialization in Applied Psychology at King’s University College.
Antirequisite(s): Psychology 4995E taken in 2021-2022 at King’s.
Extra Information: 3 hours.

Weight:1
Breadth:CATEGORY A
Subject Code:PSYCHOL
An introduction, through volunteer service and seminar discussions, to the Roman Catholic Education system. Intended primarily for students enrolled in the Honours Specialization and Major modules in Catholic Studies for Teachers.
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Honours Specialization or Major modules in Catholic Studies for Teachers or permission of the department.
Extra Information: 12 seminar hours and 75 hours of volunteer service in a Catholic High School over two terms.

Weight:0.3
Breadth:CATEGORY B
Subject Code:RELSTUD
An exploration, through volunteer service and seminar discussion, of the mission and methodologies of Roman Catholic education systems in Southwestern Ontario. Intended primarily for students enroled in the Honours Specialization or Major modules in Catholic Studies for Teachers.
Prerequisite(s): Religious Studies 2208U and Honours Specialization or Major module in Catholic Studies for Teachers or permission of the department.
Extra Information: 12 seminar hours and 75 hours of volunteer service in a Catholic High School over two terms.

Weight:0.3
Breadth:CATEGORY B
Subject Code:RELSTUD
An investigation, through volunteer service and seminar discussions, of various philosophies of education with particular reference to those employed in Catholic secondary schools. Intended primarily for students enroled in the Honours Specialization or Major modules in Catholic Studies for Teachers.
Prerequisite(s): Religious Studies 2208U, Religious Studies 3308U, and good standing in an Honours Specialization or Major module in Catholic Studies for Teachers or permission of the department.
Extra Information: Twelve 3-hour seminars, and 75 hours of volunteer service in a Catholic High School over two terms.

Weight:0.5
Breadth:CATEGORY B
Subject Code:RELSTUD
This course will explore contemporary topics of concern for First Nations in Canada from common, media, and Indigenous perspectives. In exploring these topics, students will investigate the history behind these "issues" and will critically examine and challenge their own and common perceptions, assumptions, and mis/representations of Indigenous peoples in Canada.
Prerequisite(s): Social Justice and Peace Studies 1025F/G and Social Justice and Peace Studies 1026F/G, or permission of the Program Coordinator.
Antirequisite(s): Social Justice and Peace Studies 2270A/B 2016-17 – 2019-20, Anthropology 2218F/G; Indigenous Studies 2218F/G.
Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Weight:0.5
Breadth:CATEGORY A
Subject Code:SOCLJUST
This course uses international travel and in-class discussions to examine the contributions of global civil society groups to social justice. Students will explore challenges of working outside formal state institutions and evaluate possibilities for transnational partnership for social justice. Additional costs to be borne by students.
Prerequisite(s): Social Justice and Peace Studies 1025F/G and Social Justice and Peace Studies 1026F/G, and Social Justice and Peace Studies 2304F/G; and permission of the Program Coordinator.
Antirequisite(s): Social Justice and Peace Studies 3374F/G if taken in 2015-16.
Extra Information: 3.0 hours.

Weight:0.5
Breadth:CATEGORY A
Subject Code:SOCLJUST
Women continue to be underrepresented in civic leadership. This course offers a unique experience for students who identify as women and are interested in becoming engaged in civic leadership and community building. Students are paired with a female civic leader to learn about the opportunities and barriers facing women.
Prerequisite(s): 1.0, or the equivalent, from: Social Justice and Peace Studies 2302A/B, Social Justice and Peace Studies 2303A/B, Social Justice and Peace Studies 2304F/G, Social Justice and Peace Studies 2305F/G, Political Science 2230E, Political Science 2236E, Political Science 2255F/G, Leadership Studies 2233A/B, the former Dimensions Of Leadership 2233A/B, and permission of the Department.
Antirequisite(s): Social Justice and Peace Studies 3398F, Social Justice and Peace Studies 3399G in 2016-2017; Political Science 3320E.
Extra Information: 2 hours. Limited enrolment. Meeting minimum requirements does not guarantee admission to the course. Priority will be given to students registered in Political Science or Social Justice and Peace Studies at Kings; or Political Science or Leadership Studies (Brescia). Application and interview are required. Check deadlines with your Program Coordinator/Chair.

Weight:1
Breadth:CATEGORY A
Subject Code:SOCLJUST
This course investigates the intersections of gender and ecology through an ecofeminist lens. It analyzes the historical and contemporary oppressions of women and nature in systems of patriarchy and maps links between the current climate crisis and gender. Social, economic, development and Indigenous perspectives are also examined.
Prerequisite(s): Social Justice and Peace Studies 1025F/G and Social Justice and Peace Studies 1026F/G, or GSWS 1020E.
Extra Information: 3 hours.

Weight:0.5
Breadth:CATEGORY A
Subject Code:SOCLJUST
Current social justice theories/concepts applied to an actual justice-oriented service learning project which students will co-design with a partner non-profit organization. Students will develop an understanding of the interrelationship between theory and practice and critically reflect upon their roles in furthering social justice goals through placements, reflections, and discussion.
Prerequisite(s): Social Justice and Peace Studies 1025F/G and Social Justice and Peace Studies 1026F/G, and Social Justice and Peace Studies 2304F/G; or permission of the Program Coordinator.
Antirequisite(s): the former Social Justice and Peace Studies 3201A/B/Y.
Extra Information: 3 hours. This course normally involves 80 hours of community placement.

Weight:1
Breadth:CATEGORY A
Subject Code:SOCLJUST
A beginning, structured, practice experience in selected human service agencies which reflects demonstrable competency in professional practice. Bi-weekly seminars focusing on integration of practice issues and theory.
Prerequisite(s): Registration in the third year professional BSW (Honours) program.Corequisite(s): Second-term Social Work courses.
Antirequisite(s): Social Work 3350B.Corequisite(s): Second-term Social Work courses.
Extra Information: 2 hour Integration Seminar every other week all year. Practicum in second term Monday, Wednesday and every other Friday.

Weight:0.5
Breadth:CATEGORY A
Subject Code:SOCWORK
A beginning, structured, practice experience in selected human service agencies which reflects demonstrable competency in professional practice. The opportunity for integration of practice issues and theory will be incorporated to coordinate with the student\'s practicum schedule.
Prerequisite(s): Registration in the third year professional BSW (Honours) program.
Antirequisite(s): Social Work 3320Y.
Extra Information: Integration Seminars will be scheduled in addition to placement hours.

Weight:0.5
Breadth:CATEGORY A
Subject Code:SOCWORK
An advanced, structured, practice experience in selected human service agencies which reflects demonstrable competency in professional practice. Bi-weekly seminars focusing on integration of practice issues and theory.
Prerequisite(s): Registration in fourth year Bachelor of Social Work (Honours) program.
Extra Information: 2 hour Integration Seminar every other week, all year. 3 days per week Practicum.

Weight:1
Breadth:CATEGORY A
Subject Code:SOCWORK
The social sciences are complicit in the oppression long experienced by Indigenous communities. This course situates universities, including the social sciences, as sites of colonization and seeks to disrupt this role through the introduction of Indigenous frameworks for understanding the social world. Antirequisites: Sociology 2190F/G.¿
Extra Information: 3 hours.¿

Weight:0.5
Breadth:CATEGORY A
Subject Code:SOCIOLOG
This course considers the sociological significance of drugs and drug use in society. The historical, political and cultural underpinnings of drug policies and drug use are examined, while highlighting the social implications of policies that approach drugs and drug use from moral rather than empirical positions.
Prerequisite(s): 1.0 from Sociology courses at the 1000 level.
Antirequisite(s): The former Sociology 3313F/G.
Extra Information: 3 hours.

Weight:0.5
Breadth:CATEGORY A
Subject Code:SOCIOLOG
Topic and course description will be available at the time of registration.
Prerequisite(s): 1.0 from Sociology courses at the 1000 level.
Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Weight:1
Breadth:CATEGORY A
Subject Code:SOCIOLOG
Mandatory for third-year Sociology students in an Honours Specialization. In this course students will learn to evaluate quantitative sociological research and gain hands-on experience carrying out and writing up a research project that investigates current social issues. Topics include: posing a research question, developing concepts and measures, and analyzing quantitative survey data.
Prerequisite(s): Enrolment in an Honours Specialization or Honours Double Major in Sociology or Criminology with a minimum grade of 60% in Sociology 2205A/B and Sociology 2206A/B, or Social Work 2206A/B and Social Work 2207A/B. If not in an Honours Specialization or Honours Double Major, a minimum grade of 70% in Sociology 2205A/B and Sociology 2206A/B, or Social Work 2206A/B and Social Work 2207A/B is required.
Extra Information: 3 hours.

Weight:0.5
Breadth:CATEGORY A
Subject Code:SOCIOLOG
Mandatory for third-year Sociology or Criminology students in an Honours Specialization. In this seminar, students explore the social world using qualitative methodologies. They develop research skills using approaches such as intensive interviewing, participant observation, unobtrusive data collection and grounded theory building.
Prerequisite(s): Enrolment in an Honours Specialization or Honours Double Major in Sociology or Criminology with a minimum grade of 60% in Sociology 2205A/B and Sociology 2206A/B, or Social Work 2206A/B and Social Work 2207A/B. If not in an Honours Specialization or Honours Double Major, a minimum grade of 70% in Sociology 2205A/B and Sociology 2206A/B, or Social Work 2206A/B and Social Work 2207A/B is required.
Antirequisite(s): Childhood and Youth Studies 3311F/G, Family Studies and Human Development 3230A/B, Interdisciplinary Studies 2252F/G, Sociology 3307F/G, Thanatology 3330F/G, the former Childhood and Social Institutions 3311F/G, the former Interdisciplinary Studies 2252F/G, the former Thanatology 4401F/G.
Extra Information: 3 seminar hours.

Weight:0.5
Breadth:CATEGORY A
Subject Code:SOCIOLOG
A sociological examination of the construction, causes, manifestations, and consequences of terrorism. This course explores the discursive construction of "terrorism" from dominant and subaltern perspectives; analyzes the causes and manifestations of terrorist actions; and engages in a comparison of the impact of responses to terrorism by the US and Canada.
Prerequisite(s): Third or fourth year standing in a Sociology or Criminology module.
Extra Information: 3 hours.

Weight:0.5
Breadth:CATEGORY A
Subject Code:SOCIOLOG
This course examines the historical and ongoing impacts of colonialism in Canada. Among other topics, we will consider various forms of structural violence, the key role the law and police play in colonial projects, and the move toward decolonization, truth, and reconciliation.
Prerequisite(s): Third or fourth year standing in a Sociology or Criminology module.
Extra Information: 3 hours.

Weight:0.5
Breadth:CATEGORY A
Subject Code:SOCIOLOG
This course explores how we remember, forget, and commemorate trauma and human rights violations with a particular focus on understanding the ongoing impacts of colonialism in Canada and the move toward truth and reconciliation. This is an experiential learning course that involves domestic travel.
Prerequisite(s): Sociology 3390F/G and third or fourth year standing in a module in Sociology or Criminology.
Extra Information: 3 hours.

Weight:0.5
Breadth:CATEGORY A
Subject Code:SOCIOLOG
This course will examine and critique a range of criminological theories that purport to explain criminal behavior, violence, definitions of crime, and criminal justice system responses. The various theories will be evaluated through in-depth reviews of relevant empirical research.
Prerequisite(s): Sociology 2266A/B, and enrolment in third or fourth year of one of the Honours Specializations in Criminology or Sociology.
Antirequisite(s): Sociology 4407F/G.
Extra Information: 3 hours.

Weight:0.5
Breadth:CATEGORY A
Subject Code:SOCIOLOG
The course involves a sociological analysis of domestic violence by examining the definitional, conceptual, and methodological issues that_inform theory and research. The course examines sociological research and selected theoretical perspectives that attempt to explain various types of domestic violence and the conditions under which this violence occurs.
Prerequisite(s): 1.0 from Sociology courses at the 1000 level, and 3rd or 4th year standing in an Honours Specialization or Honours Double Major offered in Sociology or Criminology.
Antirequisite(s): Social Work 4468A/B, Family Studies 3345A/B.
Extra Information: 3 seminar hours.

Weight:0.5
Breadth:CATEGORY A
Subject Code:SOCIOLOG
Using traditional and communicative practices (songs, videos, films, games) this course prepares students to interact in a daily life context and provides the foundation for continued studies in Spanish. Designed for students with little or no knowledge of Spanish. Includes a Community Service Learning option.
Antirequisite(s) at Main campus: Grade 12 U Spanish.
Extra Information: 3 lecture hours plus 1 hour online (Main); Those students with Grade 12U Spanish (or equivalent) must consult the Department before registering for this course (King's).

Weight:1
Breadth:CATEGORY B
Subject Code:SPANISH
Recent trends toward keeping people at home in their last days have increased the demand for people who are trained in supporting the dying and their loved ones. This course will investigate the roles of a death doula and examine communication, legacy work, vigils, rituals, activities performed at the bedside.
Prerequisite(s): Thanatology 2230F/G.
Extra Information: 3 hours.

Weight:0.5
Breadth:CATEGORY A
Subject Code:THANAT
Students will be exposed to various care providers in the community that work with individuals and families facing death and experiencing grief after a loss. Focus will be on integration of theoretical knowledge with clinical application. Students with a clinical focus and background will be given priority.
Prerequisite(s): Thanatology 2230F/G.Pre-or Corequisite(s): Thanatology 2225A/B and Thanatology 2231F/G.
Extra Information: Class meets for 8 hours each Monday for the first seven weeks of term.Practicum is 45 additional hours in placement setting.

Weight:0.5
Breadth:CATEGORY A
Subject Code:THANAT
An exploration of the specialized care involved in loss, death, and grief, including complexities in care models, politics and structural issues, and challenges to the provision of compassionate care in thanatology-related contexts.
Antirequisite(s): the former Grief and Bereavement Studies 6006 (Western Continuing Studies).
Extra Information: 3 hours.

Weight:0.5
Breadth:CATEGORY A
Subject Code:THANAT
Students will have an opportunity to become familiar with current research and clinical practices that relate to various loss and grief experiences.
Extra Information: 3 hours, 8 weeks online with a required weekend workshop (9AM to 4PM both days), plus one exam day TBA.

Weight:0.5
Breadth:CATEGORY A
Subject Code:THANAT
An interdisciplinary exploration of social structures and literary-cultural expressions of Western thought from the medieval era to the Enlightenment. It incorporates: 1) engagement with primary historical, literary, philosophical texts/ideas; 2) training in public speaking and critical argument; 3) \'hands-on\' exposure to music, art during seminars and field trips; 4) a Research Project.
Prerequisite(s): Enrolment in the King's Scholar program or permission of the Dean.
Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Weight:1
Breadth:CATEGORY B
Subject Code:TNLA
This interdisciplinary course compares the historical dynamics and core philosophical/literary concepts of 18th century radicalism to early 20th century modernism. Goals include proficiency in presentation skills and critical argumentation; introduction to archival work; experience of music, art, architecture, virtual scientific experiments in seminars and field trips; Independent Research Project.
Prerequisite(s): Western Thought and Civilization 2901E. For King's Scholar designation, students must be enrolled in that program.
Extra Information: 3 hours, fortnightly seminar.

Weight:0.5
Breadth:CATEGORY B
Subject Code:TNLA
Interrogating primary texts/documents, this interdisciplinary course evaluates the ambiguous impact of core 20th century intellectual, ideological, and cultural expressions on the early 21st century. Seminars and field trips in architecture, music, and art complement theoretical discussions. Students\' Independent Research Projects culminate in a public capstone conference.
Prerequisite(s): Western Thought and Civilization 3901F/G/Z. For King's Scholar designation, students must be enrolled in that program.
Extra Information: 3 hours, fortnightly seminar.

Weight:0.5
Breadth:CATEGORY B
Subject Code:TNLA
This course will provide the theoretical background and the practical experience students need to be effective writing teachers and more knowledgeable writers. Class study of composition theory and pedagogy will be complemented by a supervised teaching practicum.
Prerequisite(s): At least 65% in one of Writing 1020F/G, Writing 1022F/G, Writing 2101F/G, Writing 2111F/G or Writing 2131F/G, or permission of the program.
Extra Information: 3 hours.

Weight:0.5
Breadth:CATEGORY B
Subject Code:WRITING
This course invites students to analyze the implicit ableism of academic writing, and to engage with Disability Studies theorists who have foregrounded access and inclusion in teaching practice (in curricula, pedagogy, and assessment). Its active learning/practicum component will account for a substantial proportion of the course grade.
Prerequisite(s): Writing 1000F/G, Writing 1020F/G, Writing 1021F/G, Writing 1022F/G, Writing 1025F/G, Writing 1030F/G, or Writing 1031F/G with at least 70%, or Writing 2101F/G or Writing 2111F/G with at least 65%; or permission of the Department.
Extra Information: 3 hours, Cross-listed with Disability Studies 2262F/G.

Weight:0.5
Breadth:CATEGORY B
Subject Code:WRITING