Dr. Cathy Chovaz

Dr. Cathy Chovaz

Associate Professor

Office: FB204

Phone: Email Only

E-mail: cathy.chovaz@uwo.ca

Website: http://www.deafkidspsych.com
Academic Background 

Ph.D., Clinical Psychology, The University of Western Ontario
M.A., Clinical Psychology, The University of Western Ontario
B.Sc.N., Nursing, The University of Western Ontario 

Research and Scholarly Interests 
  • Mental Health Functioning of Deaf and Hard of Hearing School-Aged Children in Ontario
  • Deaf Children and Autism Spectrum Disorder
  • American Sign Language Interpreters and Mental Health Settings
Frequently Taught Courses 
  • Child Psychopathology (3364F/G)
  • Abnormal Psychopathology (3311)
  • Clinical Practicum (4692F/G)
  • Introduction to Clinical Skills (2301A/B)  
  • Mental Health and Deafness
Representative Publications 
Books: 
  • Du Feu, M. & Chovaz, C. (2014). Mental health and deafness. NW: Oxford University Press.
Peer-Reviewed Articles:
  • Chovaz, C.J. (2013). Intersectionality: Mental Health Interpreters and Clinicians or         Finding the “sweet spot” in therapy. International Journal on Mental Health   and Deafness; 3(1).
  • Chovaz. C.,   (2013) .  Report of a Deaf Child with Tourette's Disorder. The Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education 2; Mar 26.doi: 10.1093/deafed/ent014
  • Chovaz, C.J., Anderson, M. & Goldstein, G.M. (2011).  Autism Spectrum Disorder: A resource for parents, teachers and clinicians working with D/deaf and hard of hearing children with ASD. London, ON: Kings University College at UWO.
  • Chovaz, C.J. (2011). The Differences in Our Similarities.  Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education 2011; doi: 10.1093/deafed/enr002.
  • Murray, J.B., Klinger, L., Chovaz McKinnon, C. (2007).  The Deaf: An exploration of their participation in community life. Occupational Therapy Journal of Research, 27.
  • Chovaz, C., Moran, G. & Pederson, D. (2004).  Attachment representations of deaf adults.  The Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education, 9(4).
  • Chovaz, C. (2001). Deafness is not a disease. The Health Journal, 5(4), 34.