This course will introduce social, cultural and political developments in South Korea via films, music and popular culture. Referring to earlier periods and to North Korea when necessary and continuing to the present-day Korean Wave, we will explore Korean popular culture to understand the modern history of Korea.

This course offers an overview of a growing field of study. Drawing on a series of historical examples from antiquity to the present, the course examines the relationship of sport to nationalism, race, class, gender, politics and war, consumer culture, and economics.

An examination of the causes, course and consequences of the First and Second World Wars, stressing comparison of the two conflicts. Students will be asked to consider a variety of historical analyses of both wars and to study the process of interpretation as well as events.

An analysis of crime and law enforcement in the United States and Canada within the context of urban growth and industrial capitalism in the 19th and 20th centuries. Specific types of criminal activity will be examined, as will the development of police, prisons and vice laws.

The course will examine the social and economic impact of epidemic disease in North America by discussing outbreaks of yellow fever, cholera, diphtheria, smallpox, Spanish influenza, polio and encephalitis. Also analysed will be the evolution of public health services, medical theories and governmental regulations in response to such epidemics.

This course surveys the history of Canada with an emphasis on Indigenous peoples, colonialism and imperialism; the history of warfare and international relations; immigration, industrialization and state formation; and the diverse ways that gender, class and race shaped the lives of everyday Canadians.

Emphasis first term upon the emergence of the American nation, the egalitarian impulse, national expansion and sectional conflict; second term, upon the great transformations of the modern era; the growth of industrialism, big government, a pluralistic society, and international predominance.

Cultural, social, economic, and political themes including the Protestant and Catholic Reformations; the rise of absolutism; the commercial revolution; heresy, witchcraft, and skepticism; plague and health problems; the origins of modern science; demographic trends; the Puritans; baroque art and music; Cromwell, Gustavus Adolphus, and the creation of the modern army.

An introduction to Latin America. The first term emphasizes the colonial foundations of Spanish and Portuguese civilization in the New World; the second term emphasizes the growth of the individual republics, personalist rule, federalism vs. centralism, revolution, and the 'static society'..

This course invites students to learn about the experiences of immigrants to Canada from the historical perspective. Consider such varied themes as the politics of Immigrant Food-ways, Identity and Wartime, Black migration to Canada-Searching for More than Freedom, Religion and identity and the relationship between Immigration and Indigeneity..

From opium to oxycodone, drugs have formed an integral part in identifying concepts of "health" and "disease" in American life. Whether through prescription or self-diagnosis, Americans have come to rely on narcotics, sedatives, and stimulants to cure what ails them. Every drug has its own unique history, steeped in rich context, and this course uses a case study approach to explore the tangled history of these drugs (illicit or otherwise), healthcare, racism, state-vs-federal legislation, along with the concomitant rise of the medical profession in the United States from the 18th century onward.

This course explores the history of Korea from the tenth to sixteenth centuries, during a period of transformative change in northeast Asia.

This course will involve a detailed exploration of key debates (past and present) concerning the statecraft and economics of East Asian during the early modern period, from the Tang-Song transition of the tenth century to the beginning of European dominance in the nineteenth.

This course, which concludes with a 10-day program in Belgium and France, explores commemorative practices that emerged after the World Wars. Topics include the presentation of history through monumental architecture, the preservation of battlefields, and museums, and how these sites have informed identity and efforts to reconcile former enemies. Students in this course must also be registered in History 3797F/4797F. Further information is available at https://www.kings.uwo.ca/academics/history/experiential-learning/history-3710-4710g/

This course is a comparative history of fascist movements and fascist states in the 20th century. Topics include theories of fascism, social origins of fascist movements, the seizure of power in Italy and Germany, unsuccessful European fascist movements, fascism outside Europe, and neo-fascism.

a pre-requisite course available only to students who have been accepted into History 3710G/4710G.

This course applies historical methods and ethical reasoning to analysing current events. The class identifies a current public policy issue about which to pursue historical research. Working individually and in groups, students prepare a policy briefing that shows the relevance of history and ethics to issues we face today.

This problem-based course examines how historians construct knowledge about the past. Topics include historical methods from antiquity to present, controversies in history, conspiracy theory and malpractice, material culture, and the public presentation of history in museums, television and film.

How have Canadians thought about rights throughout our history? This course explores this question by examining rights campaigns in 19th and 20th century Canada. Themes include indigenous rights, gender and sexuality, race, and conflict and rights.

This course will examine the issues of slavery and slave societies within a comparative framework although the main focus of study will be slave systems within Latin America. Themes such as the slave trade, ethnicity, demography, and culture will be explored in order to re-create the context of slave experience.

This course, which concludes with a 10-day program in Belgium and France, explores commemorative practices that emerged after the World Wars. Topics include the presentation of history through monumental architecture, the preservation of battlefields, and museums, and how these sites have informed identity and efforts to reconcile former enemies. Students in this course must also be registered in History 3797F/4797F. . Further information is available at https://www.kings.uwo.ca/academics/history/experiential-learning/history-3710-4710g/

a pre-requisite course available only to students who have been accepted into History 3710G/4710G

This course explores the roots of the contemporary human rights movement in the era of Nazism-Fascism and the Holocaust, from the interwar period to the decades after 1945 and the development of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Topics include the role of faith-based organizations as advocates for human rights.