Learn the basics of the study of history. Explore the histories of China, Korea, Japan and Vietnam, from 1600 to 1950. Discuss East Asian history in small, friendly tutorials, online and (if possible) in the classroom.

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Threats of war; continental wildfires; presidential impeachment; global pandemic; Black Lives Matter protests in cities around the world…and that’s just the past six months. Explore the historical roots of these events in the History of Now in History 1820F at King’s University College, Fall 2020.

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In this class we explore the dynamic cultural and economic processes that linked East Asia with the broader world, from 1200 to 1800.

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Interrogate: The politics of immigrant food; Identity and wartime; Oral histories of immigrants and refugees; More than freedom seekers: black migration to Canada; Religion and identity; Immigration and indigeneity

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This class explores Korean history from the mid sixteenth century to the mid nineteenth, during a period often called the late Chosŏn.

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Topics include: Interdisciplinary study of fascist movements and regimes (e.g. Fascist Italy, Nazi Germany); Who voted for the Nazis, and why?; Women, family and marriage; Racism and Race-Laws; Eugenics; Non-European fascism; Fascism today?

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How have Canadians thought about human rights throughout our history?

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Investigate the lived experiences of enslaved people in Africa and the Iberian Empires. Examine their influence throughout the Atlantic World and how they shaped that world.

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This course explores human rights history, focusing on the language and practice of rights in the French Revolution. Students examine the foundational rights texts of the revolutionary era, and the expansion, limitation, denial of rights for women, religious minorities and people of African origins, enslaved and free, in colonial contexts.

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Weekly seminars engage the moral and historical controversies of the First and Second World Wars.

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Background:

To provide qualified students enrolled in an Honors Specialization or Major in History at King’s University College with practical opportunities for experiential learning and mentorship in a professional field of interest. 

Students will be mentored by a professional in area which they are considering a career, while applying and refining their skills in critical thinking, logical reasoning, research, analysis and writing.  Depending on the duration of the mentorship period or the nature of the work involved, students will receive a half-credit towards the completion of their History degree.

In addition to the mentorship opportunities offered directly by the Department of History, students are encouraged to identify other mentorship opportunities (paid or unpaid) of interest or relevance to their career plans. 

NOTE: The Department of History will assess these mentorship proposals in order to determine whether they are eligible to be counted for credit towards the completion of degree requirements.     

Mentoring Opportunity

HISTORY AND THE PRACTICE OF LAW

OBJECTIVE and GUIDELINES:

  • To provide senior History students (in Year 3 or 4 of their respective program) with demonstrated academic achievement and an expressed interest in the study and practice of the law to be mentored by an experienced lawyer.  The student will be assigned a research assignment relevant to the practice of the law. 
  • The student’s time and work will be monitored by a faculty mentor and a lawyer mentor, the two of whom will consult periodically to monitor the student’s progress and identify any areas of concern.
  • The student understands that this is an unpaid mentorship opportunity.  Should a student wish to complete the mentorship within the academic framework of the new History 3901F/G, Workplace Learning, the student will receive academic credit towards completion of her or his degree requirements.
  • The duration of the mentorship will be equivalent to 26 contact hours, commensurate with 0.5 course. 
  • Interested students will be required to apply formally and to provide documentation to demonstrate academic achievement and a genuine interest in legal studies and legal practice.  This will include:
    • Academic transcripts certifying that the student(s) is enrolled in Year 3 or 4 the Honors Specialization in History or History Major;
    • Student will have achieved a minimum average of 80% in her/his previous 5 full-courses;
    • Three references : 2 academic references and one character reference;
    • One-page statement of interest explaining why the student is interested in a law career and how the study of history will prepare her or him for the study and practice of law.
    • A writing sample of the student’s best graded work in a senior-level course (2200-level or above).
  • The qualified candidate(s) will be selected by a committee comprised of the Chair, Department of History (or designate), the faculty mentor and the lawyer mentor. 
  • The student understands that the University’s Code of Student Conduct and all the usual rules regulating a student’s academic work at the University will apply for the duration of the mentorship.
  • In the unlikely event that difficulties or a discrepancy of aims should arise, the law firm retains the right to terminate the mentorship at its discretion, with due notification to the student and the Department of History.

Submit an Application